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Problem: What could be causing my indoor coil to freeze up?

troubleshooting air condtioners and heat pumps

Problem: What could be causing my indoor coil to freeze up?

Answer: Air conditioner or heat pump freeze-ups are caused most of the time by a low system refrigerant charge. Before you call someone to check the charge on your system I would like to suggest the you make sure the filter is clean. Restricted air flow can also cause an air conditioner or heat pump coil to freeze. Freeze ups can also be caused by a dirty blower wheel, dragging motor (might need a new capacitor) or a dirty evaporator coil ( might need to clean the under side of the coil). Please see the YouTube video below that shows “How to clean an evaporator coil”. We also have a real good YouTube video below on “How to test a motor capacitor”.  Please click here if you would like to see the capacitors we sell. Most of the time problems with air conditioner freeze ups are because the refrigerant system is low on charge. I would suggest that you turn the AC to off on your thermostat and set your fan to “ON” so the fan can run and thaw the frozen coil. It normally takes one to two hours of fan run time to thaw out a frozen coil depending on how bad the coil is frozen. After the coil is thawed out you can turn the air conditioner back on, but make sure the larger suction line is good and cold going back into the outdoor unit. You will need to possibly get under the black insulation and feel the bare copper line. After the unit runs for 10 to 15 minutes the line should feel like a cold coke can right out of the refrigerator. If it does not feel like a cold coke can, then you are probably low on charge and need to get a technician to find the leak and charge it up as quick as possible. Please click here if you would like to see the refrigerant system leaker sealer that we sell.  It is very hard on the compressor to run without enough refrigerate because being low on refrigerant causes the compressor to over-heat. The compressor is robbed of the cool gas it needs to keep running cool. Below we have a one real good YouTube video on, “How to clean an evaporator coil” made by DIY Tinker.  We have another YouTube video which shows “How to test a motor capacitor” by Econotemplnc. Thanks to DIY Tinker and Econotemplnc for making these informative videos. If you have any questions please email us: support@arnoldservice.com or comment below. We would love to help you out and have your business! We hope this information will help you solve your problem.

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