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Problem: How do I wire up my new thermostat? What do the wire colors mean?

Problem: I purchased a new programmable thermostat. My thermostat wiring only has only three wires. The thermostat instructions call for a red power wire, a yellow, green and white wire. My three wire colors are White, Yellow and Green. How do I wire this thermostat up?

Answer: Please always take a picture or mark the wires with tape or labels as to which terminal they were connected to on the old thermostat. I would be able to help you easily if I had a picture. Do you have both heating and cooling? Most thermostats have a Red wire that is the power wire that usually connects to R & RC terminals of the thermostat, a Green wire that energizes the Fan relay, connected to the “G” terminal on the thermostat, a Yellow wire that energizes the outdoor unit’s contactor, (if you have air conditioning) and a white wire that energizes the gas valve, electric heat relay or oil burner when you need heat. The white wire is usually connected to the “W” terminal. The thermostat acts like a switch, like a light switch. The Red to white switch turns on the heat. Red to Green turns on the fan, Red to Yellow turns on the air conditioner. The main question would be do you have air conditioning? One of the wires has to be the hot wire coming from the power side of your low voltage transformer. This power wire is usually the Red wire. The color might not be red, but maybe they, the installer, used another color for the hot wire. You would need to look at your low voltage transformer, trace the wire down that is coming out of the transformer to determine the color. Below we have a very informative Youtube Video made by grayfurnaceman which explains thermostat wire color codes. We also have another real good video made by David Jones which shows how to wire up a thermostat.  If you have any other questions please feel free to email us: support@arnoldservice.com or comment below. We would love to help you out and have your business!

107 thoughts on “Problem: How do I wire up my new thermostat? What do the wire colors mean?

  1. I have a observer thermostat that im replacing for a honeywell pro series . I did the wires as descrived but nothing come on . The other problem i have is i dont have a yellow wire it look gray or drak silver but in the observer thermostat it was conected on a terminal with letter DX- i look in the diagram for it and say is the yellow but when i conected to the honeywell yellow terminal nothing work . Can you give me some help with the problem please .

    1. Hi Jossy! I am very sorry, but I do not know anything about how the observer thermostat is wired. If the description and Youtube video that we have in this post did not help you out then I can not help. I am very sorry that I can not make any recommendations other than tracing the thermostat wires to their origin. The R, RC connections should be your low voltage transformer’s power wire. The G connection should start your blower fan relay. W should start your heating relay or gas valve and Y should start your air conditioner’s outdoor contactor relay. I hope you can get this figured out. If you want to send me pictures of how your old thermostat was wired then please do. Our email address where we can receive pictures would be arnoldservice@gmail.com. I hope you have a great day! Steve

  2. Good day!

    I am upgrading my Honeywell model THX9421R and it only used 2 out of 4 wires to control heat/ac.

    WHITE-C
    RED-C

    I am hopefully upgrading My system to a Honeywell model RTH9585WF and have run into issues with the wiring. I do not know where to hook up my wires. I have the two I listed above plus a orange and green wire. Any help? I can’t get the system to turn on.

    1. Hi Jim! I am sorry, but I have no idea how a thermostat could use only two wires to control both the heat and AC unless it is on a hot and cold water circulation system. I am sorry that I am not familiar with those thermostats that you have and I can not be of any help. Steve

  3. Hi Steve,
    I am changing my AC thermostat and I have three wires (green, white and red). I connected those wires to respective slots. The problem is the air handler is working but not the condenser outside the house. I would really appreciate if you can guide me../ I am not sure whether the White is Yellow wire? Sam

    1. Hi Sam! I really do not understand how they could wire up a furnace and air conditioner with 3 wires unless your old thermostat energized the fan automatically in both the heating and cooling mode. You might check the installation manual and see if your new thermostat can energize the fan in both the heating and cooling mode. This is most commonly used on electric heat furnaces. Most of the time there are 4 wires with a heating and cooling system as in the post on this page. Red is the power wire on the R terminal, Green is the fan relay wire that powers your blower fan on the G terminal. White controls the heat on the W terminal and Yellow controls the outdoor unit’s contactor to make the AC come on and is on the Y terminal. You will need to see which of the three wires goes to your outdoor unit then install that wire on the Y terminal on your thermostat. I am sorry that I can not be of much help. Steve

      1. I am sorry – the thermostat is for AC unit only. The furnace/heating unit is not part of this thermostat. AC is stand alone and it has three wires (red, green and white). When I removed the old thermostat I didn’t see how it was wired../ Thank You

      2. Hi Sam! If the thermostat is for AC only and if the thermostat was wired according to the rule of thumb on thermostat wiring. The Red wire would go on the “R” terminal, The Green wire would go on the “G” terminal to power the fan and the white wire the only wire that you have left would go on the “Y” terminal to power the contactor on your AC unit. That would be the rule of thumb wiring, but I would recommend that you trace the 3 wires down making sure the R (the power wire) comes from the R on your low voltage transformer, the G goes to your blower fan relay and the white wire goes to your outdoor condensing unit’s contactor. I hope you can get it working soon! Steve

  4. I’m currently trying to replace my thermostat with a t5 smart thermostat my furnace wires are as follow white into w black jumped from g to y green into y red into r and white into t.In the wall its green into y white into w and red into rc.And there is a black wire and white in the wall do I need to pull the white wire out and plug it into C on the wall terminal?

    1. Hi Matt! I am sorry I am not familiar with a T5 Smart Thermostat. The wiring does not sound like it is “Rule of Thumb” on the wire colors. I am so sorry, but this is too complex for me to comment. I am afraid that I will burn your low voltage controls up if I advise you wrong. You will need to use a voltmeter to test and see which are the two wires from the transformer R and C (common). We have a good post on heat pump thermostat wiring on the following page: https://arnoldservice.com/how-to-wire-up-a-heat-pump-thermostat/ I am sorry that I can not give you any advice. Steve

  5. Dear Mr. Arnold.
    Good Morning.
    In these times of need for isolation due to Covid19, I find myself in a situation where I need help.
    I am replacing the air conditioning thermostat in my house, but I am having difficulties.
    I don’t want to call any technician because of this public health problem. So I’m trying to replace the equipment myself.

    If you can help me, I appreciate it very much.

    My air conditioner is a CARRIER, SEER 14.0, Model FB4CNPO18200C, Compressor Unit Model CH14NB01800G, with heat pump and two-Stage Thermostat.

    To understand the problem, I will describe the previous thermostat and the current thermostat that I want to install.

    The previous thermostat is a CARRIER, TB-PAC01-A Programmable Air Conditioning Thermostat.

    The wires I have on this CARRIER Thermostat are:

    Yellow, Y-linked
    Blue, connected in C
    Red, connected in R
    Green, connected in G
    White, connected in W
    Orange, O-linked
    (Picture in email I sent to you now)

    The thermostat I want to install is a Honeywell Wifi 9000 TH9320WF5003 Wi-Fi Touch Screen Programmable Thermostat.

    This thermostat has the following connectors:

    Left side:
    C
    K
    RC
    R
    RC – Jumped with R below
    R – Jumped with RC above

    Right side:
    W-O / B
    Y
    G
    W2-Aux / E
    Y2
    L

    When installing, I connected the wires as follows:

    1) Yellow Wire CARRIER Thermostat (Y) -> HONEYWELL Thermostat Connector (Y)
    2) Blue Wire CARRIER Thermostat (C) -> HONEYWELL Thermostat Connector (C)
    3) Thermostat CARRIER Red Wire (R) -> Thermostat HONENWELL Connector (R)
    4) Green Wire CARRIER Thermostat (G) -> HONEYWELL Thermostat Connector (G)
    5) White Wire CARRIER Thermostat (W) -> HONEYWELL Thermostat Connector (W)
    6) Orange Wire CARRIER Thermostat (O) -> HONEYWELL Thermostat Connector (Y2)
    (Picture in email I sent you now)

    RESULT: When I put the system to cool, it turns on the heater.

    I don’t know what wrong connection I made.

    If you can help me, I appreciate it very much.

    Sincerely;

    1. Hi Estevam!
      Happy Easter! It looks like you have everything pretty much wired right other than I would think you would need to leave the R and Rc wires jumped and the “O” orange wire controls the reversing valve. On Carrier heat pumps as far as I know the reversing valve is energized in the cooling mode. The Orange wire should go on the W-O/B terminal as far as I can tell. You will need to look in your instruction manual to see how to set the new Honeywell thermostat to energize the “O” wire in the cooling mode. There should be instructions in the manual to tell you how to do that. We have a really good post with a Youtube video on the following page which explains how to wire up a heat pump thermostat: https://arnoldservice.com/how-to-wire-up-a-heat-pump-thermostat/ I would think that the white wire would go to the W2 terminal if the white wire controls your auxiliary heat (electric or gas heat). I hope this helps you out. I hope you have a great and blessed week!

      1. Dear Mr. Arnold. Thank you very much for the prompt help that you have given to me. In times of so much crisis, finding people who think and help other people is so good, it is so Christian, that I felt loved by your words and by your gesture so altruistic. I thank you even more for the fact that the you have offered to help me on a family feast day, like today, where we all celebrate Easter, or the resurrection of Jesus Christ. Thank you one more time. I will follow your directions faithfully. I will test and see if with these clarifications I can solve the problem. Then, and I will give feedback to you on the result. I wish the you and your family, also a happy Easter with the gracious presence of Christ. Thank you so much and see you soon.

      2. Thank you so very much for all your kind words and blessings! Thank you so very much for your inspirational words! You made my day more bright, hopeful and happy that is for sure! From the looks of your wiring and if they went by the normal wire color code of how heat pump wires should be wired then you should be able to get your thermostat wired correctly. I hope that the thermostat instruction book explains how to activate the “O” wire for the heat pump reversing valve in cooling mode. God bless you and your family today and always! Steve

      3. Mr. Arnold.
        I have the following situation:
        I have a single stage Heat Pump. The AHU has an Em. Heat feature that has kicked in on a couple occasions in the past year automatically. (We’ve only been in the house since Feb 2019.)

        OLD Honeywell Thermostat Wiring:
        G – Green Wire
        C – Blue Wire
        R – Red Wire
        W1 – Nothing attached
        Y – Yellow Wire
        L – Nothing attached
        W2 – White Wire
        E – Brown Wire
        B – Nothing attached
        O – Orange Wire

        NEW Thermostat (NORTEK GoControl Model BRO-NTBZ48):
        Instructions Say:
        New – Old – My wire color
        Y1 – Y – Yellow
        G – G – Green
        R – R – Red
        C – C – Blue
        W1 – W – White
        O – O or B – Orange

        My question is where does the Brown – E wire go? The new thermostat only has Y2 and a second R that are not connected to anything. The second R is actually dual labeled as (RH) for standard HVAC systems.

        I dno’t want to lose the Em. heat feature by just not connecting it to the new thermostat as others have suggested during my online search.

        Thanks for your assistance.

      4. Hi Mike! It does not look like you have an emergency heat option on your new thermostat. If you want to use the Emergency heat option where the thermostat turns the outdoor heat pump off and runs entirely off an emergency, Aux heat source like all-electric heat then you will probably need to get a new heat pump thermostat that has that option. We have a really good post on heat pump wiring with a really good Youtube video on the following page: https://arnoldservice.com/how-to-wire-up-a-heat-pump-thermostat/ I hope this helps you out. Steve

  6. I have a 1f82-261 White Rodgers that has 5 wires,which goes to which? It doesn’t come on, Help!!

    1. Hi Heather! If you have 5 wires then more than likely you either have a heat pump or have a C (common) wire. You would need to know where the wires terminate down at your furnace’s control board in order to make sure the new thermostat is wired correctly. We have a really good heat pump wiring post and YouTube video on the following page: https://arnoldservice.com/how-to-wire-up-a-heat-pump-thermostat/ I am very sorry, but I do not like to recommend how to wire up thermostats because I do not know where the wires terminate on the furnace control board and outdoor unit. Without being there to see how the old thermostat is wired up and where the wires are connected down in the furnace then it is a guess and guessing where electricity is involved can cause lots of damage and cost if I advise you wrong. If I advise you wrong it could burn up all your low voltage electrical parts like the thermostat, control board, gas valve, etc. I am sorry, but I do not want to take this chance and responsibility. If you do not understand the thermostat wiring Youtube videos in the posts then it would be better if you get an HVAC tech or an electrician to help you figure out how to wire it up. I hope you have a great day and weekend!
      Steve

  7. I’m trying to upgrade our thermostat and found that the Green wire is attached to the Y2 location at thermostat, but at the furnace it goes to G? Please help! We have a rheem R96V two stage furnace with ac unit outside.
    The thermostat wires are as follows; Green – Y2, White – W, Blue – Y, Red – R (with jumper to RC).
    Furnace wires are as follows; Green – G, White – W1, Blue – Y1 (along with red from ac), Red – R and (white from ac to C).
    Should I install new thermostat with Green wire to Y2 or to G location? Ecobee support is telling me G location just like furnace.

    1. Hi Deborah! I am afraid to comment and help you out without being there to trace down where the thermostat wires terminate. If I give advice and it is wrong it could burn all your low voltage controls up and that would be terrible. Y2 on most thermostats would normally be the 2nd stage of a two-stage air conditioner hook up. If you have a two-stage air conditioner then this would activate the 2nd stage (high cooling) on the air conditioner. Since you say that you have a two-stage furnace many times they have a two-stage thermostat that kicks in the 2nd stage of heat (high heat) when needed by using a W2 connection on the thermostat. If your thermostat was wired for a 2 stage furnace it would have a W1 and a W2 most of the time. Sometimes contractors allow the furnace’s computer to figure out by the amount of run time in low heat when to kick into high heat and they do not use a 2 stage thermostat “W2” connection. If I was doing this new thermostat install I would read the thermostat instructions and trace the thermostat wires down to see where they terminate. I have no idea why the green wire is attached to Y2 on the thermostat. We have a really good video on heat pump thermostat installation on the following page: https://arnoldservice.com/how-to-wire-up-a-heat-pump-thermostat/ If the green wire is actually attached to the green wire down on your furnace then, yes the green wire would be attached to the G terminal on the Ecobee thermostat. The main problem is determining if you have a C (common) wire or not. If the Ecobee requires a C (common) wire you will need to run that up to the new Ecobee thermostat or the Ecobee will not work. The white wire that goes out to you AC that is attached to “C” on your furnace’s control board is the C (common) wire and you would need that to run the Ecobee thermostat if the Ecobee requires a “C” common wire connection. That fact would be in your Ecobee instruction manual. You might try to find Youtubes on how to install the Ecobee. I am a visual learner and I really like the Youtubes. Here is a link to what I found when I searched for YouTubes on installing the Ecobee thermostat. I hope this helps you out: https://www.google.com/search?q=How+to+install+an+Ecobee+thermostat+youtube&rlz=1C1ASUM_enUS497US497&oq=How+to+install+an+Ecobee+thermostat+youtube&aqs=chrome..69i57j33.14239j0j8&sourceid=chrome&ie=UTF-8 If you have any other questions please let me know. It would be best to contact me through email because these answers can be pretty long and I can send pictures through my email. arnoldservice@gmail.com Thanks! Steve

      1. Thanks so much Steve! I can send pictures to your email. The Green wire does attach at the G location on the furnace, but not the thermostat. I do need a C wire for the ecobee to work, but they include the PEK, so I was going to install that down at the furnace…that’s when I noticed the green wire was not in the same terminal as the thermostat.

      2. Hi Deborah! I emailed you with what I see from the thermostat and furnace control board pictures that you sent. I hope that this helps. God bless you and your family today and always! Steve

  8. Steve, I recently switched my thermostat with the nest. In the original Thermostat builder provided, Blue wire is connected to w1 and the white wire is connected to c. I did exactly the same in nest thermostat and so far no noticable issues! But many posts say white wire need to be connected to w1. Am I doing something wrong!!! Could you help please.

    1. Hi Murlee! You are correct if the white wire was connected to your C (com) terminal on your old thermostat then, yes you would connect the same white wire to C on your new thermostat. Most of the time the white wire is connected to W1, but some thermostat installers change the wire colors around to fit their own needs. I always recommend checking how the thermostat wires are connected down at your air handler. If the white wire is the common “C” wire then it would be connected to your low voltage transformer’s common side and the R (red) wire would be connected to the power side of your low voltage transformer. Thanks so much for asking this question! I hope you have a great and blessed day! Steve

  9. Hello,
    I have a luxaire heat pump model THJF30S41S3A. There is a white wire connected to the E terminal on the thermostat. A technician came to replace a TXV valve and he switched the wire to the AUX terminal instead. Is this connect correct?
    I also have blue, pink and brown wires that are not connected to any terminal. There is a black wire connected to the C terminal. What are the blue, pink and brown wires for?

    thank you for your help.

    1. Hi Ly! Most of the time the W (white) wire is the auxiliary electric heat or what your auxiliary heat is (gas or electric). You would need to trace the wires down in your air handler to see what the blue, pink and brown wires are used for. Many times contractors will run 8 to 10 wire thermostat cable and there are 3 or 4 extra wires that will not be connected to anything. We have a really good post and one really good YouTube video on the following page that I hope will help you out because it explains the wiring on a heat pump thermostat. Here is the link to that page: https://arnoldservice.com/how-to-wire-up-a-heat-pump-thermostat/ The tech should have traced the wires for you and I would not think that you would need any changes, but it would not hurt to check the wiring. I hope you have a great day! Steve

  10. I have a 14 year old Ruud heat pump that is connected to a 30 year old York electric furnace. Recently the outside unit has been running none stop (even when it was way too cold outside for it to work). The indicator light on the thermostat is not on but the outside unit continues to run. I tried turning it off at the thermostat, then the 3 breakers on the furnace but it would still not shutoff. I eventually turned it off by flipping the 30 amp switch that supplies the power to the outside unit. Do you have any idea what is happening here?
    I would also like to change the thermostat to a Honeywell Smart Thermostat. My old one only has 3 wires connecting it to the control box on the furnace. I’m told that I would have to run a new cable with 10 wires in it and that it could take 3 to 4 hours to figure out how to connect them and test the system. What do you think?

    1. Hi Dave! This sounds like the contacts on your contactor might be welded together. I would like to suggest that you look at the following post that we have on the following page: https://arnoldservice.com/problem-air-conditioning-outdoor-condensing-unit-or-heat-pump-unit-will-not-shut-off-it-continues-to-run-no-matter-what-you-do/ Yes, most heat pumps have at least 6 wires to make them run correctly. We have a really good post on the following page that shows how to wire up a heat pump thermostat: https://arnoldservice.com/how-to-wire-up-a-heat-pump-thermostat/ The Youtube videos are really good. If you have any questions please let me know. Steve

      1. Steve, I took your advice and changed the contactor, I did not change the thermostat. You were right (Thanks), the heat pump went back to normal, however I seam to have another problem. The unit is cycling on and off too frequently. It runs for 20 minutes and them shuts off for 5 minutes and then starts up again. The thermostat is set for 68°F and the current outside temp is 25°F.

      2. Hi Dave! Sorry to hear that you are still having problems with your heat pump. You would need to find out what device is causing the heat pump to shut off prematurely. This could be a thermostat problem, a loose wire connection problem, a high or low-pressure system switch problem or a defrost control board problem. I would like to suggest that if you have not already to make sure that all your wire connections are good and tight. A loose wire can cause high amperage draw and send the wrong signals back to the thermostat. When your unit cuts off prematurely check with a voltmeter to see if you are getting 24 to 28 volts AC between the Y and C (com) wires. If you are not getting 24 volts between Y and C then it is the thermostat that is cutting your heat pump off prematurely. Some of the thermostats are built to cycle every so many minutes of run time. Your thermostat might be set to cycle every 20 minutes. Many thermostats have instructions that come with the thermostat that tells you how to increase or decrease the number of cycles. I hope this is a simple solution for you. If your thermostat has batteries make sure the batteries are in top condition. Please let me know if you have any questions. I hope that you find an easy inexpensive solution. Steve

  11. Fantastic post. Thanks for the read. Quick question. So I’ve got an older home that only has a furnace. I’m seeing just two red wires. One is attached to the W and the other is attached to the R. There also seems to be a tiny u-shaped hook that is connecting the R terminal (with the wire) to the RC terminal (no wire). What does that mean? Does that mean the one attached to the R is a C-wire? Thanks for any insight!

    1. Hi Mark! The R to RC jumper wire is probably a factory-installed wire. If you had air conditioning you would need the R to RC connection to provide power to the air conditioner side of the thermostat. No sir, it is not a C common wire. The wire on the R terminal of your thermostat is the power wire coming from your low voltage transformer and the other red wire goes to the gas valve to provide power to the gas valve when your thermostat calls for heat. There should not be a common “C” wire on your thermostat. All that the thermostat does is act like a single-pole switch. When the thermostat is calling for heat it makes the connection between the R and W. When the thermostat is satisfied and your home is warm enough the thermostat breaks the connection between the R and W wires. You can leave the jumper between R and RC on or take it off. Thanks for your kind words and for asking this question! I hope you have a great day! Steve

      1. Thanks for the incredibly thorough response, Steve! Much appreciated. I’m in the market for a smart thermostat, so I’m trying to think through how to navigate around currently not having one. What are your thoughts on products like Venstar Add a Wire? Are they safe long-term? Or is it just best to pony up and have an electrician come add a C-wire? Thanks again for the great advice!

      2. Hi Mark! I am sorry, but I do not know anything about the product Venstar Add a Wire. I would see if they have any reviews about this product. I purchased a Sensi Smart WiFi thermostat for my home and my son’s home and we love it. We purchased it from Home Depot and it does not require the C wire to run. The thermostat runs off batteries and I have to change the batteries about once a year. We can control the thermostat from a SmartPhone or anywhere in the world if there is an internet connection. I believe the thermostat was about $140. Make sure that you get the one that does not require the C wire. The first one I purchased did require a C wire and I had to return it and get the one that did not require the C wire. The model number for our Sensi thermostat is 1F86U-42WF. I hope you can find one. God Bless you. Steve

  12. Hi Steve, I just purchased a Honeywell Smart Thermostat with Wi-Fi Model:RTH9585WF. The instructions state that you need a connection from the ‘C’ terminal on the control board to the thermostat ‘C’ terminal. On the control board in the furnace there is one wire connected to the ‘C’ terminal which goes out to the compressor. The other compressor wire goes to the ‘Y’ terminal. The blue wire in the 5 wire thermostat cable is not connected on either end so is it okay to connect the blue wire to the ‘C’ terminal on the control board along with the one that goes to the compressor?
    Thanks in advance, Murray

    1. Hi Murray! Yes, you can connect the blue wire alongside of the C wire that goes out to your outdoor unit. You can use the blue wire as “C” common for your new thermostat. That is nice because many times thermostats only have 4 wire cable and you have to run new thermostat wire to get the 5th common wire. I hope you get it up and running soon! Steve

      1. Thank you for the very quick response Steve. Enjoyed your ‘God’s Gift to Us’ page.
        Happy New Year, Murray

      2. Thanks so much, Murray! Happy New Year to you as well! God Bless you and your family today and always! Steve

  13. Hi experts ,

    I want to check if my central AC system is compatible with Nest learning thermostat, I opened the AC control panel and found that 4 wires go out to the thermostat , wire colors are not important (brown , black , orange and red), but the labels on the board are : GND , B , A , +12V
    can someone tell me if it’s compatible , and which wire goes on which in Nest thermostat. ( the AC is cold and hot compressor based central AC)

    1. Hi TAreef! I am sorry, but I have never installed one of the Nest thermostats and I am not familiar with the installation. Here is a link to the installation instructions: https://nest.com/support/images/000001204/Nest_Learning_Thermostat_Installation_Guide.pdf You might try to call Nest customer support and ask them your questions. I am very sorry that I can not help you out or give you any advice. Steve

    2. Hi Steve my thermostat is hook up but I can’t t get the air to come on but the heat will what do I have wrong

      1. Hi Ceasar! The only thing that I can think that you might not have the jumper wire connected between RH and RC. Some thermostats require a jumper wire between these two terminals on the thermostat. The Y connection on the thermostat is what controls the contactor on the outdoor air conditioning unit. If you would like to send me pictures of your wiring, please do at our email arnoldservice@gmail.com. I will be glad to take a look at the wiring and give you my recommendations. I hope you can easily find and fix the problem. Steve

  14. Hi Steve,
    I don’t have the luxury of the small black piece, I only have wires sticking out of my wall. I’m wiring from a 2000 Fleetwood Mallard Trailer. The wires coming out of the wall are green, yellow, grey, orange, red, and black. The ones on my thermostat are green, yellow, grey, white, red, and blue. If I hook up the matching colours I can get everything except my heat on, which with it being October I’d love to get it running. Any ideas on wiring the wall wires into the new thermostat? I’ve tried the blue to black and Orange to white but that makes a light show happen in my trailer.

    1. Hi Megan! I am very sorry, but I have no idea how to wire your thermostat. I would like to suggest that you find where the wires terminate at your air handler or furnace. On most thermostats, if you tie the red, green and white wires together with a wire nut you should get heat. Like I say I would suggest that you trace the different color wires that come out of your wall back to the air handler or furnace and see what each wire controls. So sorry that I can not be of any help. Steve

    2. yellow to yellow, green to green, grey out of wall to white, red to red and black out of wall to blue. Now verify your grey out of wall is heat at your furnace (W) and your black out of wall is (C) at your furnace.

    3. Hi, I’m not sure if I am going to be telling you something that I have learned that might be your problem. Make sure that the wires that you are connecting to your thermostat match the wire placement that are connected in your furnace. For example, in your furnace a white wire might be connected where the G is, but when you look in your thermostat, the white wire is connected in the W slot.
      I hope this makes sense, and also helps you.

  15. I received a new smart thermostat from my electric company and am trying to figure out how to wire it correctly. I have an electric heat pump with an O changeover. I took a picture of the old wire and all but one transfer easily. I have this current set up. Yellow- Y, Green-G, Light Blue- C, Black-O/B, White- E and Red-R. All of them can transfer except of the White-E. My new thermostat does not have an E terminal and I am struggling to figure out where to connect it. Would I connect it to the AUX terminal? I assume that with no E terminal, the new thermostat does not have the ability to run in emergency heat mode (It has only been run in emergency mode when the heat pump was down.)

    1. Hi Scott! Yes, I would think that you would connect the White to the Aux terminal. On most heat pump wiring, the white is the 1st stage of electric heat and black is usually emergency or the 2nd stage of electric heat. If your old thermostat had the black wire on O terminal then I would keep the black on the O for the reversing valve terminal. You might want to call your electric company support team to make sure, but I would think that the white wire should go on the “AUX” terminal. I hope everything works out well for you. Steve

  16. Hi,
    I appreciate your time. I purchased a Wifi thermostat and I have a basic understanding of the wiring but I have a couple of issues:

    1. inside my old thermostat I have a white wire on O, a red wire on R (24 v as measured at the air handler), and my yellow and green wire are on W with a jumper to Y. This confuses me as I don’t understand the 3 wires together. Inside the air handler I have the white wire spliced to another white, the yellow spliced to another yellow, the red on the R (24 v) and the green on the Green. Is this all screwed up or does it make sense and once I solve my C wire issue it will all work out on the WIFI unit if I follow the instruction and do not jump anything except the R and RW.

    2. I have a blue C (unused wire) but it is not hooked up anywhere on either end. On the air handler side I do not have a C but I do have a B and I read that B/C is the same on a Trane unit. That B terminal does not have power (it should not, right? because its a neutral?).

    I know this may be confusing but its worth an ask as I am too stubborn to call someone out and I plan to WIN this battle against my wiring 🙂

    1. Hi Kevin! I am very sorry, but without being there to see where the wires terminate I have no idea where the wires go or what they do. You will need to trace down each one of the wires to see what they control. I would like to suggest that you go down to your air handler and write down what each color wire controls. Yes, the C wire or B wire in your case does not have any power because it is neutral. You should be getting 24 volts AC between the C and R connections R (red) is the power wire from your low voltage transformer and C COM is the neutral of your low voltage transformer. The thermostat is like a light switch and switches on and off between the red power wire and other wires on the thermostat. When your heat pump thermostat calls for cooling the thermostat switches power on from Red to Y (outdoor contactor) Red to G (indoor blower relay) Red to O (reversing valve solenoid). W1 and W2 are usually auxiliary electric heaters that would be used in the winter for electric heat. We have a really good post with a Youtube video on how to wire up a heat pump thermostat with auxiliary heat and what the functions of the wires are on the following page: https://arnoldservice.com/how-to-wire-up-a-heat-pump-thermostat/ Sorry that I can not be of much help. I know what rule of thumb is on the wiring, but from your description of how the old thermostat is wired it does not sound like rule of thumb. If you have any specific questions please send them to our email address arnoldservice@gmail.com I know you can get it figured out. I love to hear your confidence! You can do it! Steve

  17. I just replaced my thermostat, the new one has batteries and does no have a slot for the blue wire. What do I do with the blue wire.?

    1. Hi Buben! If your new thermostat does not have a C common wire connection and it runs off batteries then I would recommend taping the blue wire off so it does not touch any other wires or parts of the thermostat. After taping with electrical tape I would recommend stuffing it back behind the thermostat out of the way of other wires. You do not want this common wire to touch any other wires or parts of the thermostat because this could cause a direct short and burn up your thermostat and any other low voltage components. I hope the thermostat works well for you. Steve

  18. Hello sir. I recently purchased a new Honeywell Wi-Fi smart thermostat. I noticed on my old White Rodgers thermostat has only four wires red, blue, green, & white . The blue wire is tied to yellow slot of the old Tstat. The Old thermostat has a yellow wire jumper/pigtail that goes to backside of the thermostat to the auto and on. My new thermostat Cooling will not kick on, once wire are connected to the new thermostat. I traced the yellow wire into the furnace and the yellow wire is not connected to anything. Can you please advise .

    1. Hi! I am sorry, but I do not know how they have wired your old thermostat and I do not know how the Honeywell Wi-Fi thermostat is supposed to be wired. Most of the new thermostats require a 5th common wire. If you have 5 wires available that you can use then you should be able to hook the common up on your C terminal on your control board and use the new thermostat. If you do not have 5 wires then you will either have to run new 5 wire cable or get another thermostat that can run off batteries and does not require the common connection. I have a Sensi Wifi thermostat that does not require a 5th common wire and it does a great job. Sorry that I can not be of much help. It is hard to make recommendations when I can not see how your thermostat is hooked up both at the thermostat and down at your furnace control board. If I advise you wrong I could burn up many of your controls and cause lots of damage. Sorry that I can not be much help. Steve

  19. Hi I bought a new smart thermostat and cant figure out the wiring as the letters are different and from what I read you cant trust the colors! Any help would be greatly appreciated my old thermostat has 11 terminals with 9 wires connected and my new one has 9 terminals. I can also send a picture of both if that helps, thanks

    1. Hi Cathal! It would be a guess to me as to where the wires on the new thermostat attach if you did not take a picture of the wiring on the old thermostat before removing it from the wall. You would need to look and read the instructions that came with the new thermostat to make sure it is wired properly. There are several good Youtube videos that explain how to wire heat pump thermostats on the following pages: https://www.youtube.com/watch?reload=9&v=qiAOvJhq8_s and https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=fFL_ZSkAZM0 I hope these two videos will help you understand where the wires go. If you would like to send me pictures you can to our email address: arnoldservice@gmail.com. I hope you can easily get the wiring figured out after watching the videos. I hope you have a great and blessed weekend! Steve

  20. This Shawn I have question new unit I got heat strips that unit has black wire blue wire white wire green and red then from ac outside has yellow and blue were do these go on thermostat

    1. Hi! I can tell you what the rule of thumb (normal) wiring would be, but I strongly recommend that you make sure that my recommendations are going to the right controls. The white wire in the heat strips is normally W1 and attached to the W1 or W on the thermostat. The Black wire on the heat strip is usually the 2nd stage of electric heat or sometimes called “Emergency” heat and would attach to the W2 or E terminal on the thermostat. Green on the heat strip unit normally is the fan relay wire on the air handler and would attach to the G terminal on the thermostat. Red on the heat strip unit is usually the Hotwire off the low voltage transformer and would go to the R connection on the thermostat. The Blue wire on the heat strip unit is normally the Common wire on the low voltage transformer and would go to the C connection on the thermostat. The Yellow wire on the outdoor unit normally go to the Y connection on the thermostat and the Blue wire normally goes to the C Com terminal on the indoor unit’s control board. I hope you can get the thermostat wired correctly. There should be instructions that come with the thermostat. Hope you have a great day! Steve

  21. My current thermostat doesn’t have a C wire and I want to replace it with a wifi thermostat that needs a C wire.
    The current wires I have are R, W, Y, and G. I have tested that between the R&W there is 24Volts, R&Y there is 24Volts and R&G there is 24 Volts.
    The thing is that with this unit, I only use it for A/C only; not heat. I guess there might be an electric heat element in the air handler?
    I have a separate boiler for heat, connected to a separate thermostat.
    My question is, can I use the White wire to “power” the wifi thermostat (i.e. use the W wire instead of a C wire).
    Thanks for your advice

    1. Hi Karl! If any of the 4 wires are not being used then you can use the one that is not being used as a C common wire for your new thermostat. Most of the time R to Y controls the outdoor AC contactor. The R to G controls the fan blower relay on the air handler or furnace. R and W control the electric heat or gas valve. If the W wire is not hooked up to anything then you could use it for the C wire. I had this same problem with a Wifi thermostat I was installing at my son’s home in Chicago. I did not want to run a 5th wire so I took the thermostat back to Home Depot that required a 5th common wire and purchase a White-Rodger Sensi thermostat that does not require a 5th wire and runs off the batteries. I have had one of the White-Rodger Sensi thermostats installed at my home for over 2 years and it works really well with only 4 wires. I hope you have a great weekend! Steve

      1. Steve, maybe you can help me with this. I was messing around with my thermostat and accidentally pulled a little bridge cable that I know came from the Yellow section to another cable that was being used. The AC is not coming in cold now. My set up only has Yellow, Red, Green, Blue and white. Just trying to figure out where that bridge went to.

        Thank You!

        I followed exactly how the previous one was connected as the following.

        Yellow > Ye
        Green> G
        Blue> C
        Red> R
        White>O/B.

      2. Hi Juan!
        Most of the time the bridge or small jumper wire goes from RH to RC if you have an RH and an RC on the new thermostat. R is the 24-volt power wire and if you do not have the jumper installed you will only get heating RH or if you only have the red wire on RC you would only get cooling. Another possibility might be the White O/B wire problem. The O/B connection is for the reversing valve relay. Most thermostats energize the reversing valve in the cooling mode. If you have a Rheem or Ruud outdoor unit the reversing valve is energized in the heating mode and of course, this would cause heating if your thermostat is not set right. There should be instructions that came with your new thermostat that explain how to change the “O/B” terminal to energize the reversing valve in the heating mode if you have a Rheem or Ruud unit. I hope you can easily find and fix the problem. Steve

  22. Hi Steve,

    Brand new modular home!! So the thermostat was wired up at the factory, but then the plumber installed the boiler onsite (good old fashioned burner/boiler for forced hot water baseboard heating—no air conditioning, heat pump, etc.). The current thermostat has 6 wires connected, but at the boiler in the basement it looks like the plumber only used the Red and White wires (the other wires are just cut off in the sheathing). I want to upgrade the thermostat, so I’ll assume that I only have to connect the Red and White wires since those are the only two connected at the boiler?
    Thanks so much for all your great advice!
    Paula

    1. Hi Paula! Yes, that is what I would assume to and that would be to connect the Red and White wires up since those are the only two wires you have. Sorry that I can not be more helpful.
      Steve

      1. Thanks so much Steve! Sorry for the second inquiry—-I didn’t see my first post until I had already sent the second. I will fire this up so keep your fingers crossed for me!

      2. Best of luck! I hope it works! Steve

  23. hi Steve,

    Thanks for all this great advice! I was wondering if you could help me? I just finished a modular home so a thermostat was installed in the factory, and then after the boxes were set the plumber installed a boiler for the forced hot water baseboard system. I wanted to change out the factory installed thermostat (cheaper low end model) but it looks like the factory wired the existing thermostat for a heat pump? Here are the wires left to right: Brown wire connected to B; Blue wire connected to O; Green wire connected to G; Yellow wire connected to Y; White wire connected to W; Red wire connected to R. The new thermostat has a Y, G,W, and R, which I think is probably the set up for a good old fashioned boiler? Please let me know what you think.

    Thank you again for all your help!

    kind regards,
    Paula

    1. Hi Paula! I am sorry, but I do not know how to advise you on changing to your new thermostat. I am afraid that I will advise you wrong and burn up something. Here is a link to a good video about wiring up a heat pump thermostats. I hope this helps you out: https://youtu.be/qiAOvJhq8_s Sorry that I could not give you any advice. Steve

  24. I am removing an,old carrier mercury thermostat that has w,y,r,g wires…AND a short red wire that goes from yellow to 1.

    I will him the colirs above to the same,on the new honeywell digital but do I need that red wire from Yellow to 1? There is no 1 on the honeywell digital…just r and rc

    1. Hi Dfour! I am sorry, but I have no idea what the yellow wire to 1 is for. I do not know what the 1 on the thermostat is for. Yellow (Y) usually controls the air conditioner’s contactor. White or “W” usually controls the gas valve. Green or G usually controls the fan relay or blower motor and Red, R is usually the hot wire off the transformer. Most of the time you will need to use a jumper between R and RC so the air conditioner will work. Sorry, I do not know what the “1” is for. I hope you can find out. Steve

  25. Hi Steve,
    I am trying to replace an old mercury thermostat that has a red wire connected to “1” and two black wires (one is hot) connected together to “4”. #2 & 3 don’t have any wire connections. So there is a total of 3 wires. I am replacing it with a new digital Honeywell RTH111 thermostat but can’t make it to run properly. I connected the hot black wire to W terminal and red wire to R, and taped the end of the non-hot black wire without connecting to any terminal. When I turned the braker back on and turned the switch on the thermostat to “Heat” the heat will go and keeps going even when the temperature went passed the set point. It stopped when I turned the switch on the thermostat to “Off”. It seems to be either on or off but not being controlled by the set temperature point. Please help.
    Thanks,
    Trung

    1. Hi Trung!
      I would recommend that you trace the wires down at your furnace to see which colored wire terminates because if you accidentally wire the thermostat up wrong it could damage your heating or cooling system. Red is usually the hot wire off the 24-volt power supply of the low voltage transformer. You would need to see where these three wires terminate to be safe. It would be a guess for me if I tried to advise you. Sorry that I can not be of any help. We have a good video on thermostat wiring on the following page: https://arnoldservice.com/12-problems-and-mistakes-when-installing-or-replacing-thermostats/ I hope you can figure it out. Steve

      1. Hi Steve, I recently replaced the old style turn thermostat with a Honywell RTH2200/RTH221.
        Replaced the ignitor as well. Now when its cycling thru heat the fan keeps going constantly. Pass the heat exchanger cool down period. Have 4 wires going to New Thermostat, suggestion?

      2. Hi Shane! I would like to suggest that you make sure that your furnace is not going off on high limit. You can check the limit to make sure that the furnace is not overheated by testing with a voltmeter. We have a post about this problem on the following page: https://arnoldservice.com/problem-your-fan-on-your-furnace-runs-all-the-time-and-will-not-shut-off/ This could also be caused by the thermostat supplying 24 volts through the G (green) wire constantly. I would recommend that you check with a voltmeter between G and C (com) on your furnace’s control board when the furnace blower should not be running to make sure that the thermostat is not sending 24 volts between the G and C wires. This would cause the furnace blower to run all the time. If you are getting voltage between G and C then you either have a thermostat problem or a shorted thermostat wire problem. You could try taking the G wire off the thermostat and see if the blower still runs all the time. If the blower stops then you know that you have a thermostat problem. This could also be a stuck relay on your control board and you might need a new control board. I hope you can easily find and fix the problem soon. Steve

  26. I am replacing an old mercury thermostat for upstairs air flow. The old had the white wire connecting to Y, black wire connecting to R, and a ground wire connecting to GRD. My guess is Black to R, White to Y, and the ground connecting to the “not used” connect on the new Honeywell RTH2300/RTH221. Is this correct?

    1. Hi Mr. Burdick! Please make sure that the old thermostat that you are replacing is a 24-volt thermostat. I have never heard of a thermostat having a “GRD” ground wire unless it was 110 volt. I have heard of thermostats having a common wire which is the other side of the 24-volt transformer. Red on the low voltage transformer would be the hot wire and C, common would be the neutral side of the 24-volt transformer. Yes, If you wire it up like the old thermostat you are replacing you would wire white to Y and black wire to R. With this wiring configuration you are not going to have any heating because W would be the connection to turn the heat on. I hope you do not need any heat. Steve

  27. I have a new T5+wifi thermostat. It has w c g y r terminals.
    My old thermostat has only two wires, one black one white.
    Inside the furnace I have no w c g y r terminals. I see where the black and white wires are connected. I also see a 24 volt terminal and a ground terminal. I’m going to run a four wire cable from the T5 to the furnace. I need to know where to connect the wires on both ends. Thank you.

    1. Hi John! Since you only have two wires on your furnace and no R, C, W, Y and G terminals on your furnace control board then depending on how old the furnace is you might not have a fan relay and it does not look like you have air conditioning set up on your furnace because if you did you would have a G connection and a Y connection (at least 4 wires). I would suggest that you look at the Wifi thermostat’s instructions and see if the thermostat requires a common wire to operate. What you have right now is the R and W wires and you would need to find out by looking at your furnace’s wiring to determine which wire (black or white) goes to control the gas valve (would normally be the white wire and W on the thermostat connection) and which wire is the hot wire of the low voltage transformer (usually red goes to the R connection on the thermostat). If the thermostat does not require a C common wire (the neutral side of the transformer) then you could just use the 2 wires. If you plan on adding air conditioning in the future you would need a minimum of 4 wires and if the new wifi thermostat requires a common (C) wire then you would need 5 wire cable. There are lots of Youtube videos that describe how to wire wifi thermostats on the following page: https://www.youtube.com/results?search_query=how+to+wire+up+a+wifi+thermostat I would suggest that you get someone familiar with thermostat wiring to help you out. I hope you can get it figured out soon. Steve

  28. I have a honeywell TH1110DV1009 thermostat. I want to replace it with a smart thermostat. I have R (with jumper),W,Y.G. There is a wire designated C and is labeled common. This says I should be in good shape. I tried to read 24VAC across it to the R wire. It does not show a voltage. I don’t want to get deep n the install of the new thermostat and find a problem. Is this normal?

    1. Hi Denny! Some thermostats require a 5th common wire from your furnace’s transformer. If you are going to install a new Smart Thermostat and it requires a 5th common wire to supply 24 volts to the new thermostat then you will need to make sure that the common wire is hooked up to your furnace’s transformer. You probably already know this but the transformer on your furnace should be hooked up to your furnace’s control board. R is the power wire from the transformer and C is the common or neutral wire. Electricity runs from the power wire to Common or neutral. So if you do not have a common wire you will not get 24 volts at the thermostat. If the new thermostat does not require the 5th common wire then you will not have to worry about getting the common hooked up. I hope you understand what I tried to explain. Here is a good Youtube video link which should explain what I am trying to explain: https://youtu.be/F4UyDiBdbew I hope you get it figured out. Thanks for asking this question.

  29. Hi Steve,

    I’m trying to install a new thermostat for family. They had removed the old thermostat before I got there, thinking it would speed up the process. They have the following wire colors: Red, White, Yellow, Green, Orange, and Blue. I have connected the wires in the following way: Red to “R”, White to “W”, Yellow to “Y”, Green to “G”, my question is what do I do with the Orange and Blue?

    1. Hi Nathan! The wires should be looked at to see where they originate. If this is hooked up wrong it could burn up the thermostat and many low voltage controls. Sounds like they must have a heat pump and rule of thumb is the Orange would go on the O terminal to control the reversing valve on a heat pump and the Blue is usually the common on the transformer which is hooked to “C” on the thermostat. The Blue is very important to know where it originates because the common on the transformer if hooked up wrong can burn up lots of costly low voltage parts. I suggest that you trace where the wires original to be safe. Sorry that I can not be much help. Steve

  30. Hi Steve
    I am replacing an old mercury analog thermostat with a new analog thermostat( no mercury) There are only 2 wires, one Red and one Black. the old thermostat has a R and Y hook up and so does the new one. I unfortunetly did not take a picture of how it was hooked up before taking it apart. I hooked up the new one with Red to R and Black to Y. But when I turn up the heat nothing is happening. Is it possible that the Black should be hooked up to the R ? I live in a condo that has Hot water heat. The heating store that I bought the thermostat at checked on the computer to be sure I was replacing with the proper model. Honeywell T822L
    carm
    Thanks

    1. Hi Carmel! On the new thermostat, the “W” connection controls the heat. So I would try Red to R and Black to W. “Y” on most thermostats controls the cooling and should have nothing to do with the heat. I hope you get it working right soon! Steve

  31. Hello Steve,
    I am trying to replace my Honewell TH9421C1004 with and RTH7600 by Honewell. The control box is a THM5421C and the wiring is set up as a 3 wire control which is what is required on the TH9421C1004 and it is marked 1,2,3. The RTH7600 has more wires and in the wiring diagrams in the book shows no 1,2,3 and is set up with the multi wire system.

    Can the RTH7600 be used as a 3 wire or do I need to wire the disconnected wires back up in the THM5421C so that they are energized?

    Thanks in advance

    1. Hi Chris! Thanks for asking this question, but I am sorry, I do not know the answer because I am not familiar with the two thermostats. I would suggest that you contact Honeywell technical support and ask them your question. So sorry that I can not help you out! Steve

  32. Hey Steve – question for you – I upgraded to a nest, hooked it up without a C wire to see if it would work, it didn’t do well so I took it off and put my old honeywell thermostat back on. I took a picture and hooked it up the same way, but now the AC isn’t blowing air out the vents. All the fans inside and outside are running fine though. My thermostat does heat/AC and I have a white, blue, green & red wire; the blue was hooked up to the ‘Y’ spot on my thermostat originally. Any suggestions? Nice of you to keep up with this post and help people out, I’m sure everyone appreciates it.

    1. Hi Conor! Thank you so very much for your kind words! I would suggest that you test the control board wires with a volt meter set to “Volts AC” with the thermostat calling for cooling and the furnace safety switch door taped down so you can get power to the furnace or air handler. You should be getting 24 volts between R and C, G and C, and Y and C. R and C shows the power coming from your low voltage transformer, G and C sends 24 volt power to the fan relay on your control board to turn the blower on and Y and C sends power to your outdoor unit’s contactor to make it turn on. If you are not getting 24 volts between those wires then you have either a thermostat problem or a thermostat wire problem. If you want to by-pass the thermostat then, you could turn the power off to your furnace. Take all the wires loose from your thermostat. Tie or twist the R, Y and G wires together, turn the power back on to your furnace and the air conditioner and furnace blower should blow. If not then you may have damaged the fan relay on your control board. I hope you can find and fix the problem soon. If you have any questions please let me know. Steve

  33. hello i have the yellow wire connected together with the W terminal
    can you give me a little help with

    1. Hi! I would suggest that you try to trace down where the yellow and white wires terminate in your furnace, air conditioner or air handler. Since you say the yellow and white wire are on the same W terminal then this would indicate that who ever wired the thermostat wanted the heat and the outdoor unit to come on at the same time. Usually the W (white wire) controls the (electric heat) or gas valve and the Y wire (yellow) usually controls the outdoor heat pump or air conditioning unit. If you have a heat pump then maybe your thermostat is wired to cut the electric heat on with the outdoor heat pump unit. I strongly suggest that you trace and find out where the yellow and white wires are going to see what they are controlling. I hope you can easily find and solve the problem. Steve

  34. I would like to replace my a Honeywell TH8000 with an Ecobee or similar wireless Thermostat. I have only three wires (R, G and W) which are connected to R/RC, G and W on the thermostat. The thermostat controls gas heater and separate A/C unit so I believe C is wired at the fan relay.
    Can I use any replacement thermostat

    1. Hi Russ! I am sorry, but I do not understand how 3 wires can control both a furnace and an air conditioner. To me you would need at least 4 wires for a thermostat that controls heating and cooling. As in the post. R is the hot wire from the hot side of the low voltage transformer. G attaches to the fan relay to turn the fan on when the air conditioner is on W white turns the gas valve on in heating mode and Y yellow would turn the out door air conditioning unit on. You would need a 5 wire thermostat cable to run the “C” common wire to the thermostat. I am sorry that I do not have any suggestions because to me you do not have enough low voltage thermostat wires. Sorry that I can not be of any help.
      Steve

  35. Hi. I am installing a new smart thermostat. Currently I only have an 18/3 wire in place (R, W, G). I am planning to fish through a new 18/5 wire to add a common for the new thermostat. I don’t have AC in the house, and was wondering if I should connect the fifth wire up to my thermostat and furnace, or if I should leave it unconnected. I have enough terminals on the new tstat, and the furnace control board has unused terminals marked W2, Y1, and Y/Y2?

    1. Hi Andrew! Most electronic thermostats do not require a 5th wire because most you can use the batteries to run the thermostat. On many of these thermostats if you want the thermostat to light all the time then it will need the Common wire. If the 5th wire is not connected to anything in the furnace then I would recommend leaving it disconnected. So you probably have 4 wires connected: R (red the power wire from the thermostat) W (white wire to control the heat or attached to the gas valve, G (green wire controls the fan relay to turn the fan off and on) and B (blue wire connected to the C common terminal on the control board) I hope this helps you out. Hope you have a great day! Steve

  36. My old thermostat is techy. The blue and green wires were wrapped up and not used. The red and white were screwed connected to the back panel. Additional red and black wires were screwed into panel and plastic connector at other end plugged them into what looks like a motherboard. Replacing it with a Honeywell RHT2300. As instructed for a heat pump without auxiliary/backup heat I connected the red, white, green and blue wires with a jump between yellow and white and left the jump between the R and Rc. I moved the switch from gas or oil to electric or heat pump. Didn’t work. Any suggestions? I used a paperclip for the jump wire. Oh, and then I tried to put the old one back on and it didn’t work! I’m replacing it because if you set it above 68, it loses communication with the furnace and does not shut off furnace. Hope you have idea!

    1. Hi! Sorry to hear you are having trouble wiring up your new thermostat. I sounds like that you are saying that only the red and white wires were used on your old thermostat which usually means that your old thermostat was a heating only thermostat. The red wire is the power wire from your low voltage transformer and the white wire controls the gas valve to start the heating cycle. Sounds like the other wires might not be hooked up. You will need to trace each of the thermostat wires down to see what each color wire controls. I hope the following post and Youtube videos on the page will help you out: https://arnoldservice.com/problem-i-purchased-a-new-programmable-thermostat-my-thermostat-wiring-only-has-only-three-wires-the-thermostat-instructions-call-for-a-red-power-wire-a-yellow-green-and-white-wire-my-three-wire/ If you can not get the old thermostat to work after reinstalling it then you might have a blown fuse on the control board. I would suggest checking the fuse. I hope you can easily find and fix the problem. Sorry, I do not know about wiring a Honeywell RHT2300 thermostat. Sorry that I can not be much help. Steve

  37. I was about to replace my thermostat and found that the yellow wire was connected to the “y” post on the thermostat, but it is connected to the “c” post on the control board on the furnace. Nothing is connected to the “y” post on the control board. My extra “c” wire is wrapped around on both ends and not being used. For the new thermostat, I need to use the “c” but I’m afraid to connect it to the “c” terminal on the control board because the yellow is already connected there. Ever seen anything like this?

    1. Hi Mark! You would need to trace the wires down and make sure the thermostat is wired right or it could burn up many of the low voltage controls if not wired properly. Sometimes when installers connect the air conditioner up they do not join the wires at the control board, but join them away from the control board with wire nuts. I would suggest that you find out which two wires go to your outdoor AC unit. The AC is controlled by the Y terminal connection on the thermostat and the other wire that leads out to your AC unit has to be connected to the C (com) terminal in order to get 24 volts to make the contactor engage. Rule of thumb colors for the wires are: R (red) power wire from the hot side of the furnace’s transformer. C (blue) comes from the common side of the furnace’s transformer. G (green) usually goes to the fan relay “G” connection on the control board. W (white) goes to the W connection on the control board and controls the furnace’s gas valve. Y (yellow) goes to the outdoor AC unit’s contactor to turn the AC off and on. I hope you can get the wiring figured out and corrected. Steve

      1. Thanks very much for your response!

  38. I just bought a Honeywell thermostat to replace the old one. The old one had only three wires connected….green, red, and white. The white was connected to the yellow terminal. There was a fourth wire, another green one, the wasn’t attached. Now for the problem. I attached the wires exactly the way they came off but only got cold air. I switched the white to the white terminal and got heat. How do I connect my compressor now?

    1. Hi! I would suggest going to the furnace and see how they have connected the thermostat wires to the control board. I do not know how to advise you because in every thermostat that is a gas furnace and has air conditioning the thermostat would need 4 wires. Red (hot low voltage wire) Green (the fan relay wire) White (the heat or gas valve wire) and Y (the air conditioner contactor wire). Sorry that I can not give you any advice. I hope you can figure it out by watching the videos we have at the bottom of this post. Steve

  39. Just bought a Honeywell replacing the old Honeywell. The new one doesn’t have a W for the white wire?

    1. I have never heard of the thermostat not having a “W” connection. All the thermostats that I have installed over the years have had a W, W1 or W2 connections. Here is a link to a good Honeywell thermostat installation YouTube video: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=c_ZDrNeeG94 I hope you can figure it out.
      Steve

  40. I just bought a Honeywell thermostat but my wire has red yellow green and black, how do I wire my black wire. Thank you so much.

    1. More than likely the black wire is the heat (W) connection, but I would make sure by going down to the furnace and see where the black wire connects on the control board. In a normal thermostat set up the red is the R power wire, Green is the G fan wire and yellow is the Y outdoor air conditioner contactor wire. So the only one left would be the W (usually white) gas valve wire. I would check to make sure down at your furnace’s control board. It is always a good idea to take a picture before removing wires from a thermostat or a furnace. I do this to make sure I get things wired back up right. I learned to do this from my mistakes! Thanks for asking this question. Steve

  41. Mine only has three also but the colors are white red n blue what color goes to what

    1. Hi Silvia!
      I would suggest that you take the furnace or air handler blower door off and see where the wires are attached on the control board. Most of the time Red (R) is the hot wire from the low voltage transformer. White (W) controls the heat or gas valve and you would have to see where Blue is attached on the control board. It could go to (G) green which would control the fan or it could be a (C) common wire which attaches to the common on the transformer or (Y) which attaches to the contactor on the air conditioner if you have air conditioning. If you have air conditioning then more than likely the Blue wire is attached to the Y connection which turns the AC off and on. I hope I have answered your question. Steve

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