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Problem: How Do I Test My Gas Furnace Rollout Switch, Limit Switch, Pressure Switch and Flame Sensor?

Problem: My gas furnace’s ignitor will not glow, my electronic ignition will not spark and my gas furnace will not ignite the gas. Steve, You told me to make sure that all my safety controls are closed before testing the control board and other components for problems. Where are the furnace’s safety controls that you are referring to and how do I test these controls to make sure they are working correctly?

Answer: We have this question asked a lot. For the gas furnace to operate the safety controls like the rollout switches, limit switch, and pressure switch have to be closed and allow the 24 volt AC current to flow through the controls. If you have an open safety control then your furnace will not operate. The safety controls are installed by the manufacturer’s engineers to prevent a fire and possible carbon monoxide poisoning. The flame sensor has to sense the gas burner flame and send microamps back to the furnace control board telling the control board that there is a flame. No flame sensed by the flame sensor then within 8 to 10 seconds the flames cut off. No heat!  We have an excellent YouTube video made by AC Service Tech LLC below that explains how to quickly test and troubleshoot these safety controls. If you find out that you need a rollout or limit switch then please click here to see the rollout and limit switches that we sell. If you test and find out that you need a pressure switch then please click here to see the furnace pressure switches that we sell.  If you find out that you need a flame sensor then please click here to see the flame sensors that we sell. If you have any questions or if you would like for us to look up parts then please send us your furnace’s model number by email at support@arnoldservice.com. We will be glad to try and help you out. Please comment below if you have any questions or comments.  We would love to help you out and earn your business! 

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Problem: Please help me identify my gas furnace parts, functions and how they operate?

Problems: We have these questions asked many times: Where are the various parts on my gas furnace located? Many of our potential customers ask where is the hot surface ignitor, gas valve, flame sensor, control board, draft inducer, limit, and rollouts on my gas furnace located? I can not find where this part is located? Where are the parts located and what function does each part perform? How does a gas furnace operate?

Answer: We have these questions asked a lot. Below we have a really good super great YouTube video where AC Service Tech LLC shows and explains where the gas furnace parts are located and what the functions are for each gas furnace part. This is an excellent gas furnace troubleshooting video! Thanks so very much to AC Service Tech LLC. for making this excellent educational and informative video!! The video shows where the following gas furnace parts are located: control board,  control board fuse, low voltage transformer, thermostat, blower door safety switch, blower motor, blower motor capacitor, inducer motor, inducer motor capacitor,  pressure switch, limit switch, rollout switches, hot surface ignitor, flame sensor, burners, and gas valve. 

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Problem My Gas Furnace Will Not Heat! What Furnace Parts Might Cause This Problem?

Problem: My Gas furnace will not heat or work. What furnace parts might be the cause of this problem? 

Answer: We have this question asked lots. There are 6 main parts that can cause your furnace to not heat. Some of these parts can be blamed or misdiagnosed as bad when actually the part is good. The only way to find out if the part is bad or not is to do some testing. Below we have a really good super YouTube video where AC Service Tech LLC shows and explains what the 6 most frequently misdiagnosed parts are and how to test them. I have listed below the video many troubleshooting links where AC Service Tech explains how to troubleshoot each furnace part in detail. There are also links to the troubleshooting tools that AC Service Tech uses in the video. Thanks so very much to AC Service Tech LLC. for making these excellent informative videos!! 

The 6 parts that are blamed and misdiagnosed most often are:

  1. Flame Rod or Flame Sensor- Usually cleaning the flame sensor will fix the problem.
  2. Gas Valve –AC Service Tech LLC has testing and troubleshooting links to YouTube Videos below.
  3. Pressure Switch-AC Service Tech LLC has testing and troubleshooting links to YouTube Videos below.
  4. Control Board-AC Service Tech LLC has testing and troubleshooting links to YouTube Videos below.
  5. Blower Motor is bad or on High-Efficiency furnaces, the ECM Blower Motor is diagnosed as bad-Many times a motor run capacitor can be replaced on PSC (Permanent Split Capacitor) blower motors and it will fix the blower motor problem. Most of the time the ECM motor module is bad and the motor is not actually bad. Replacing the motor module is less expensive than replacing the entire ECM motor.  AC Service Tech LLC has testing and troubleshooting links to YouTube Videos below.
  6. Heat Exchanger is bad. If one of your rollout switches is going off where you have to reset the rollout switch then this is a sure sign that you have a heat exchanger or venting problems. Make sure your condensate drain is open and your vent is not obstructed if you have a 92% or above condensing furnace that produces water during the winter.

Below we have a great video made by AC Service Tech LLC. that shows the

Below are many links to a more detailed explanation for troubleshooting the problems described in the video. Thanks so very much AC Service Tech LLC. 

Related Videos: -Top 10 Pressure Switch Problems-  https://youtu.be/bY6QcnlbutI -Pressure Switch Troubleshooting-  https://youtu.be/v9QWIr9TIVU -Cleaning the Condensate Tubing-  https://youtu.be/guf3TESb3V0   -Pressure Switch Testing and Replacement-  https://youtu.be/6P6r6POGHDcHow -The Pressure Switch Works-  https://youtu.be/9DAEZvkyO9A -Why The Pressure Switch Wont Work While the Condensate Drain is Clogged-  https://youtu.be/XKAyznghlro -Using The SDMN6 to Test Pressure Switches- https://youtu.be/mKtGL8NJ58Q -ECM Blower Motor Testing: Make Your Own -ECM Tester- https://youtu.be/lKsIgjEJDII   -X-13 ECM Blower Motor Testing-  https://youtu.be/SamEuSzvYbEECM -Variable Speed Blower Testing- https://youtu.be/locNv9WsanA -10 reasons Why The Blower Motor Won’t Turn On- https://youtu.be/T5j4Q8Zp_qk -4 Reasons Why the Blower Motor Won’t Shut Off- https://youtu.be/wX3hCqwUjkE -What Type Of Blower Motor Do I Have-  https://youtu.be/EHwTZFvv-2Q -240 volt PSC Blower Motor Fan Speeds- https://youtu.be/5GITgsRmSZ4 -How to Tell the Difference Between Blower Fan Motors- https://youtu.be/EHwTZFvv-2Q -Gas Valve Troubleshooting-  https://youtu.be/euUrufn6AsI -Combination Gas Valve, How it Works-  https://youtu.be/7m5ZDvOoVwU -Smart Valve Troubleshooting-  https://youtu.be/qjrrXmLlLRc -Furnace Flame Sensor and Rectification Troubleshooting-  https://youtu.be/LtfghUYfl-4How -Flame Rectification Works-  https://youtu.be/kfQ2ivr4gSw -Single Rod Spark Ignition and Flame Rectification- https://youtu.be/GNYdOIvWyyk   -Two Rod Spark Ignition and Flame Rectification- https://youtu.be/dUFcVJXJ8Vg -Troubleshooting the Furnace Control Board- https://youtu.be/phsUYxo75jU -Thermostat Wiring to a Furnace and AC Unit- https://youtu.be/GoThAlOvSts -Heat Pump Thermostat Wiring Explained- https://youtu.be/tf2OxCDwlFY -Thermostat Wiring Diagrams- https://youtu.be/h24-n9kyw0w -Clogged 90% Furnace Heat Exchanger- https://youtu.be/sNlWZEzSfrA -Why the Furnace Sequence of Operation is Important- https://youtu.be/uKsRpYmwlnM Electrical Diagnosis Tools: UEI DL389 Multimeter http://amzn.to/2xAdaJf UEI DL479 Multimeter with temp sensor http://amzn.to/2jtsUbJ Magnet Jumpers- https://amzn.to/2PyKPQZ Alligator Jumpers- https://amzn.to/2PxqJXn Irwin Wire Stripper/Cutter/Crimper http://amzn.to/2dGTj2V Water Column Manometers FieldpieceSDMN6 Dual Manometer Pump – http://amzn.to/2jyK5Ka UEI Digital Dual Manometer – https://amzn.to/2CWC6BD Supco Universal Adjustable Pressure Switch -.01wc -10.0wc – http://amzn.to/2G1y0py 3/16″ x 3/16″ x 3/16″ brass barbed tee – https://amzn.to/2INSRhQ 1/8″ NPTF x 3/16″ barb fitting for reading wc pressure – https://amzn.to/2G563Bq Combustion and CO Detectors: Testo CO detector https://amzn.to/33yqkqK Testo 310 Res Combustion Analyzer https://amzn.to/2NuYAO5Testo 310 Res Combustion Analyzer with printer https://amzn.to/33vLl53 Testo 320 w printer  https://amzn.to/33xZbUz Vacuum Tools: JB 6 CFM Vacuum Pump – http://amzn.to/2nqbvo8 CPS 4 CFM Vacuum Pump – https://amzn.to/2DxgPwY Appion Valve Core Removal Tool – http://amzn.to/2uYr8WL Appion Blue 3/8″ to 1/4″ Vacuum Hose – http://amzn.to/2uYlVyc Appion Red 3/8″ to 1/4″ Vacuum Hose – http://amzn.to/2uYg6Ro Yellow Jacket 1/4″ by 1/4″ 3’ hose – http://amzn.to/2umtcod Appion 1/4″ by 1/4″ and 3/8” hose – https://amzn.to/2Zyxzx9 Uniweld 1/4″ by 1/4″ 2’ hose – https://amzn.to/2GFov1Y CPS Vacuum Micron Gauge – http://amzn.to/2v1nM3O Checking the Charge Tools: Yellow Jacket Refrigerant Gauge Set http://amzn.to/2aenwTq Refrigerant hoses with valves http://amzn.to/2aBumVI Compact Ball Valve for Refrigerant Hose https://amzn.to/2KUisW8 QuickDisconnect 90 for refrigerant hose https://amzn.to/2MMtVcg RectorSeal Bubble Gas Leak Detector http://amzn.to/2ckWACn Fieldpiece ST4 Dual Temp Meter http://amzn.to/2wc1ME3 Fieldpiece Bead K Type Temp Sensor https://amzn.to/2DBwKfs Fieldpiece Wet Bulb Temp Sensor https://amzn.to/2RRI7Tw Fieldpiece TC24 Temp Clamp https://amzn.to/2qHLyjZ Refrigerant Leak Detection Tool: Accutrak VPE Ultrasonic Leak Detector https://amzn.to/2nFYKVe

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How to clean out a 90% high-efficiency furnace’s condensate drain line properly

We have many people who have high-efficiency furnaces that either leak water in the wintertime or the condensate drain line stops up and causes pressure switch problems. If the blink code on your furnace is showing a pressure switch fault then you might have a stopped up furnace condensate line. The blink code is the blink code (number of LED flashes) on the furnace’s control board. The blink code key most of the time is found on the furnace’s blower door or access door. If you have a 90% high-efficiency furnace that produces water in the wintertime then we have an excellent YouTube video below made by AC Service Tech that shows how to properly clean out the condensate drain line. Thanks so much to AC Service Tech for making this excellent video! We have condensate traps and condensate line drain kits on the following page: Please click here if you are interested in seeing the various furnace condensate traps and condensate line repair kits that we sell.

If you have any questions or if you would like for use to look up a part for your furnace or air conditioner then please send us your furnaces brand name and model number to our email address: support@arnoldservice.com

We Would Love to Help You Out and Earn Your Business! Steve & Barbara Arnold

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How do I tell if my gas furnace’s inducer motor is bad?

Problem: I turned my thermostat up to try and get my heat to come on and nothing happens! My furnace’s draft inducer will not start. After 30 seconds to a minute, I get a flash code on my control board that shows, “Pressure Switch Failed to Close”

Answer: We have this question asked quite often. The first component of the furnace that should start up after the thermostat is turned up to call for heat is the draft inducer. It might be necessary to tape your furnace’s safety door switch closed temporarily so you can test the furnace’s control board with a voltmeter. Test with a voltmeter on your furnace’s control board to make sure you are getting 24 to 28 volts AC between the W and C (com) thermostat wires that come from the thermostat. If you are not getting 24 volts between W and C (com) then you either have a thermostat problem, a thermostat wire problem, the thermostat might not be turned on heating or turned up, you could have a low voltage transformer problem or a blown fuse on the control board. Make sure that the batteries in your thermostat are in good condition. If you are getting 24 volts between W and C (com) and the draft inducer is not coming on then please watch the following really good YouTube video made by AC Service Tech LLC. Craig Migliaccio on “How to tell if a draft inducer motor is bad”.  Please click here if you would like to see many air conditioning and heating videos made by AC Service Tech. I believe these are the best HVAC Repair Videos on the Internet! I hope this post will help you in finding and fixing your furnace problem! If you have any questions please comment below or email me, Steve Arnold at Support@arnoldservice.com. Thank you so much for your time and support with our website!  

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Problem: Furnace blink code shows I have a pressure switch problem. Replaced pressure switch. Still have a problem?

Problem: Hello, love the website and help that it offers. But I seem to be out of options with my furnace here. I have a Carrier HE furnace that is not even 3 years old yet. We have had repeated issues with the furnace running for 2-3 minutes, stopping, recycling, and coming back on until the desired temp is reached. Sometimes this will occur 3-4 times depending on reaching the desired temp in the home. When I called a technician he came out and charged 170$ just to tell me my pressure switch was broken. And offered to replace it for another 150$(!). I ordered one myself and replaced it last weekend. Took me 5 minutes and the switch was 60$. But, I’m still having the same symptoms. Sometimes the furnace will not even come on and we awake to a cold house. Other times it works just fine…??… it’s “buggy” as I describe it. I am getting a 3 to 1 LED code indicating pressure problems. But I have cleaned the water trap multiple times and there seems to be no issue. No water lines to or from being blocked. The exhaust is not blocked leading outside. Nor is intake. And again the pressure switch is brand new (supposedly). And I have also cleaned the flame sensor with a newspaper (no steel wool). I don’t believe that is the problem. Seems clean. No residue on it. So, if you can offer any help please do! Cleveland is about to have sub-zero Temps coming up this weekend! Chris

Answer:  Hi! I am terribly sorry that you have encountered all these problems with your furnace. We have a furnace troubleshooting flow chart that I hope will help you out on the following page: Please click here if you would like to see our Gas Furnace Troubleshooting Flow Chart. I would start by making sure the thermostat is providing 24 volts between W and C terminals on the control board when the furnace cuts off. If you are getting a constant 24 to 28 volts AC to the furnace all the time between W and C when the furnace cuts off then this would eliminate the thermostat from being the problem. If the control board is correct in saying and showing that the pressure switch is the problem… then I would suggest looking at the things like you have already have, like the condensate trap and drain lines from the secondary heat exchanger. We have a really good YouTube Video made by AC Service Tech, below that shows how to properly clean out a furnace’s condensate drain lines and trap. Please make sure the furnace is tilting forward slightly so the water drains out the front of the furnace. The installation instructions on these high-efficiency furnaces tell how many feet of the vent pipe is allowed for venting. If the allowed vent feet are exceeded then you will have trouble with the pressure switch not staying closed. The 90 degree turns in the venting sometimes are calculated as 5 feet of piping. If you have exceeded the number of turns the furnace will not run right and the pressure switch will not work or stay closed. I remember one furnace I installed where I tried to use 2″ PVC for the venting and ended up having trouble with the pressure switch going off like your furnace is doing. I ended up having to tear the 2″ pipe out and install 3″ PVC vent. The venting is critical for these high-efficiency furnaces to run right, to say the least! Some other things that cause furnace pressure switch problems are: (1) A restricted vent pipe (2) Too long of vent piping and too many turns which exceeds manufacturer’s recommendations (3) a stopped-up condensate drain line if you have a high efficiency condensing furnace. (4) a dirty or stopped updraft inducer. The hole where the pressure switch attaches to the draft inducer could be stopped up with water, slug, or dirty. (5) a slow draft inducer that might need a new capacitor or has slowed down. (6) someone has sucked on the pressure switch with their mouth or forgot to unhook the pressure switch from the furnace before using a vac on the furnace. Sucking on the pressure switch or leaving a pressure switch attached to the furnace when vacuuming out the condensate line will ruin the diaphragm on the pressure switch. (7) A leaking heat exchanger. If your furnace has a leak in the heat exchanger combustion gas is allowed to mix with air in your home or in with the blower motor air. This hole in the heat exchanger will not allow the negative pressure that the pressure switch needs to close and operate properly. If you find that you have a hole in the heat exchanger then you need to replace the heat exchanger or get a new furnace because this creates a dangerous condition that can allow carbon monoxide into your home.  I hope you can find and fix the problem. If you need parts please send me your furnace’s product number. Please email us anytime if you have a question. Our email address is support@arnoldservice.com. If you think you have a bad pressure switch Please click here to see the furnace pressure switches we sell. I hope you have a blessed day.  Steve Arnold

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Problem: Burners ignite the gas valve cuts off after only a second because the pressure switch is opening for a split second.

Problem: Can a draft inducer motor somehow get “weak” before it seizes up or shows some type of problem? My furnace code is telling me pressure switch/vent problem but I have checked both and they function fine. The problem is when the burners ignite the gas valve cuts off after only a second or two because the pressure switch much be opening for a split second (if I bypass the switch the burners stay ignited and everything works). With no vent problems and pressure switch working like it should I am down to thinking that either the inducer motor is not keeping up when the burner ignites and gives a little burst of pressure, or maybe the gas volume is set a little too high so that the burst of ignition is causing a pressure pulse that opens the switch. I’m not sure which one would be more common after running fine for 10 years. If I run the furnace for a few minutes with pressure switch bypassed, and then shut down, hook switch back up and restart, the system will ignite and run as it should, but later after being off for a while it will not stay lit and does the same thing and gives same code.  This leads me to believe that when vent and system is hot it can draft better and switch will not open when burner first ignites so whatever the problem is, it is just barely giving enough pressure change to open the switch when ignited and system is cold. Inducer or gas volume or have you seen something in this situation that could be the problem? Thanks.

Answer: Excellent question! I have seen this problem happen before when I was doing service work. Most of the time it was caused by the pressure switch itself being the problem. The diaphragm inside the pressure switch gets tight over time or the diaphragm develops a small leak and will not sense the right pressure. Please click here if you would like to see the pressures switches that we sell.  Please email us anytime with your furnace’s model number if you would like for us to look up part numbers for you. Our email address is: support@arnoldservice.com We would Love to Help You Out and Have Your Business!

The second most common cause is the pressure switch tubing (line) being slightly obstructed with water or debris. If your Lennox furnace is a condensing furnace that produces water when it runs, then please make sure the water drain line on the furnace is draining well. Please make sure the pressure switch tubing where it attaches into the draft inducer is not obstructed with water, or the hole where the pressure switch tubing attaches to the draft inducer is not obstructed. If you are having a slight delayed ignition when the furnace first starts up then you might want to clean the burners with compressed air. Clean the pilot or furnace lighting mechanism to make sure the furnace lights smoothly. Too much gas pressure or too little gas pressure can cause a furnace to have delayed ignition. You can adjust the gas pressure if you think you might be getting too much or too little gas pressure.  I show how you can do this on the following page: Please click here if you would like to see our Gas Furnace Troubleshooting Simplified Page. Please be careful when trying to adjust gas valve gas pressure. This can be dangerous when working with natural gas. A draft inducer’s bearings can get tight, or the inducer blower wheel can get dirty which could slow it down. Please make sure that the draft inducer wheel turns freely. A good test would be to watch to see how long the draft inducer wheel spins after the draft inducer goes off. The wheel should spin from 3 to 5 seconds after the power goes off to the draft inducer. If the draft inducer does not spin very long (only a second or two) then the bearings on the draft inducer might be tight and you will need to purchase a new draft inducer or a new inducer motor.  If your draft inducer has a run capacitor you might want to check the capacitor to make sure it is reading in the right specs and not weak.  A weak capacitor will cause the draft inducer to run slow. You said, the vent is not obstructed so this isn’t the problem. I would also suggest to look at the things on the furnace like the condensate trap and drain lines from the secondary heat exchanger. Please make sure the furnace is tilting forward slightly so the water drains out the front of the furnace. The installation instructions on these high efficiency furnace tells how many feet of vent pipe are allowed for venting. If the allowed vent feet are exceeded then you will have trouble with the pressure switch not staying closed. The 90 degree turns in the plastic PVC venting sometimes are calculated as 5 feet of piping. If you have exceeded the number of turns the furnace will not run right and the pressure switch will not work or stay closed. I remember one furnace I installed where I tried to use 2″ PVC for the venting and ended up having trouble with the pressure switch going off like your furnace is doing. I ended up having to tear the 2″ pipe out and install 3″ PVC vent. The venting is critical for these high efficiency furnaces to run right, to say the least!  I hope that I given you some insight into what might be the problem. I am sorry we do not sell very many Lennox parts but I will be glad to try and help you out anyway I can. Steve Arnold, https://arnoldservice.com

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How to test and troubleshoot gas furnace pressure switches.

Furnace

Question: How can I test to see if a pressure switch is operating properly?

Answer:

  • Set your meter to volts AC, turn your furnace on so it is calling for heat. The draft inducer should start.
  • There should be either two or three wires going into your pressure switch.
  • Probe one lead of the pressure with one lead of your meter while touching the other lead of your meter to the ground. The ground would be any bare metal part of your furnace. This must be bare metal. I always try to touch the other lead of my meter to the furnace’s switch box.
  • If you have a two-wire pressure switch with the draft inducer running you should be getting 24 or more volts between both leads to the ground. By this I mean if you touch one terminal of the pressure switch with one lead of your meter, and touch the other lead of your meter to the ground, the bare metal part of your furnace, you should get 24 or more volts (24 to 28 volts).
  • If you do not get 24 or more volts with the furnace draft inducer running then you have a pressure switch problem.
  • Please click here if you are interested in seeing the furnace pressure switches that we sell
  • A gas furnace pressure switch problem could be caused by the following:
    • Your vent could be stopped up with a bird’s nest, wasp nest, or debris.
    • You could have a bad, dragging, dirty, or slow running draft inducer. A weak or bad draft inducer run capacitor could cause the draft inducer to run slow.
    • Your draft inducer could be loose and not attached tightly to the body of the furnace. Make sure that the draft inducer is attached tightly with no air leaks.
    • You could have a bad control board that is not sending 110 volts to the draft inducer to allow the draft inducer to run. You might have a bad control board draft inducer relay.
    • The tube that runs from your pressure switch to the draft inducer could be plugged up. Many times the tube is plugged up with water. If the pressure switch tube has water in it then this is a sign that your condensate drain line could be stopped up or not draining properly. You can disconnect the pressure switch tube and run a wet vac to hopefully clear the stopped up furnace condensate drain line.
    • The draft inducer hole where the pressure switch tube connects could be plugged up. I have seen the draft inducer holes get stopped up so bad that I had to use a small drill bit and drill to open the hole back up.
    • In high-efficiency condensing furnaces, the water drain line could be stopped up, causing water back up and blockage in the pressure switch tube. *Make sure you disconnect the pressure switch tube before using a wet vac because the high vacuum of the wet vac can damage the pressure switch. I usually take the drain hose loose from the condensing furnace and use a wet vacuum to open the drain back up.
    • I wanted to post this because many people are telling me that they are sucking on the pressure switch tubing to test the pressure switch operation. I have heard from other forums that you should not suck on the pressure switch to test it because this can damage the diaphragm inside the pressure switch. It would be best to use a manometer or test with a voltmeter as we advise on this page. I wanted to pass this along so others will not damage pressure switches.
    •  A leaking heat exchanger can cause the pressure switch to not close because when the blower comes on the blower pressure is allowed to mix with the combustion air and will mess up the pressure switch’s negative pressure. A hole in the heat exchanger will not allow the draft inducer to create enough draft (negative pressure) to close the pressure switch. A stopped up heat exchanger will not allow the combustion air to circulate properly and cause the pressure switch to open up. I hope that you do not have a leaking heat exchanger because most of the time this means a new furnace.
  • Please click here if you are interested in seeing the furnace pressure switches that we sell
  • Please email us anytime if you have any questions. Please send us your furnace’s model number if you would like us to recommend a pressure switch or part for your furnace. Our email address is Support@arnoldservice.com  We would love to help you out and earn your business! 
  • Below we have three really good Youtube videos made by GrayFurnaceman and Word of Advice TV that show how to troubleshoot pressure switches on an 80% furnace and how to by-pass a furnace pressure switch. Thanks to GrayFurnaceman and Word of Advice TV for making these informative videos! Jumping or by-passing a pressure switch would be good to do if you were troubleshooting and wanted to make sure that the pressure switch was the problem.  I hope these videos will help you troubleshoot your gas furnace pressure switch.

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Problem: Will the pressure switch correct my water drainage problem?

HVAC troubleshooting videos

Problem: Will the pressure switch correct my water drainage problem. (HK06NB124) Carrier 9200 weathermaker. Water stands in the condensate tube and cuts the unit off until I drain the tube.

Answer: No sir, the pressure switch will not correct your water drainage problem. I would suggest making sure your furnace drain is clean. When I was doing service I would disconnect the pressure switch tubing so it will not damage the pressure switch, then use a wet vac to vacumn out (suck) the drain line out. This should clear all the debris out. You might even need to take your condensate trap off and wash it out with a hose. If the furnace does not drain properly it will cause the pressure switch to open the circuit and not allow your furnace to run. If you want me to look up parts I will need your furnace’s product number. The product number should be located inside the furnace near the burners. Our email address is: support@arnoldservice.com Please click here if you are interested in the many name brand furnace pressure switches that we sell.   Please click here if you would like to see the Wagner, Gallo Gun Swoosh condensate line drain cleaner we sell. We would love to help you out and have your business!

Below we have a video made by Buddyraccasac which shows how to unclog an AC drain using a wet vac. This is a similar to what I recommend with the furnace condensate drain. The condensate drain would be near the bottom sides of the furnace and you would need to make sure you disconnect your pressure switch tube so it will not damage the pressure switch when you use the wet vac.

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Problem: Draft inducer will not start, ignitor will not glow or gas valve will not open.

Problem: Draft inducer will not start, ignitor will not glow or gas valve will not open. I think my furnace’s draft inducer is having problems?

FYI:  *You would be surprised how many people go without heat or cooling for hours/days and all the problem they have is the switch on the side of the furnace is not turned on or the blower door is loose after they change a filter! One customer blamed his cat for turning it off! LOL!  I try to go over this with my customers before I make a service call so I do not waste their money.

Solution: Any combination of the above problem or problems could be caused by a bad furnace control board or bad draft inducer. I always troubleshoot and test the least expensive parts first, such as the thermostat, pressure switch, limit switch and rollout switches to make sure they are all closed and operating correctly before I go to the control board. First, and most important things to remember is turn your electrical power off to the furnace. We have two really good Youtube videos below that show the 8 top problems when a furnace draft inducer will not start. This excellent video was made by acservicetech. Thanks to acservicetech for making this great video!

We have another really good YouTube Video made by Word of Advice TV which covers the following information:

Is your inducer motor not turning on? Or perhaps the inducer motor is noisy or stuck? Does not shut off or turns on and off? All of these question are covered in this video along with inducer motor troubleshooting, testing, and checking. Here is a little summary of what is covered in the video: 1. Noisy Inducer Motor 2. Stuck Inducer Motor 3. Inducer Motor Not Starting 4. Checking Voltages on an Inducer Motor 5. How to Check the Capacitor 6. How to Check Resistance 7. Inducer Motor Running Nonstop 8. Inducer Motor Turning On and Off Thanks so very much to Word of Advice TV for making this excellent troubleshooting video!

1. The first thing that is supposed to start when a furnace starts up is the draft inducer. If the draft inducer does not start then you probably either have a thermostat , thermostat wiring problem, electrical problem, control board problem or a bad draft inducer.

2. Tape the blower door safety switch shut (if equipped) and set your thermostat so it is calling for heat.  Us a volt meter set to “Volts AC” and test between terminals W (usually white wire) and C (Com) and see if you are getting 24 to 28 volts between these two terminals. If you are getting 24 to 28 volts between the W and C terminals then your thermostat and thermostat wiring are in good shape and doing what they are supposed to be doing. If you aren’t getting any voltage then you might have a bad thermostat, bad thermostat wiring, not getting 110 volts to the furnace (make sure switch on furnace is flipped on and blower door safety switch is pushed in) or a blown fuse on the control board. We have a picture of a fuse on the control board below. Most of the time you can get these fuses at a local hardware store.  You would be surprised how many people go without heat or cooling for hours and days and all the problem they have is the switch on the side of the furnace is not turned on or the blower door is loose after they change a filter! I try to go over this with my customers before I make a service call. If the fuse on the control board is blown this usually means that you have a short in the low voltage circuit of the furnace. Most of the time I find that the animals have chewed through the thermostat wires and shorted them out or the thermostat wires over time have been pinched around the body of the furnace or air handler which has caused them to short out. You will probably need to replace your thermostat wire if you find it has shorted the fuse out. If the fuse does not fix the problem with the low voltage then you may have burnt out the transformer. We sell some transformers on the following page: Please click here if you are interested in seeing the transformers we sell. You should have a constant 24 to 28 volts AC between the R (red) and C (com) terminals on the control board no matter how the thermostat is set. This is the power coming right off the low voltage transformer.  If you do not have 24 to 28 volts between R and C then you probably need a new transformer.

3. Most control boards are located in the blower compartment. Many control boards have a fuse located on them to protect the board from getting burned up if you have a short to ground. The fuse is usually a 3 to 5 amp fuse similar to the fuses that you might find in a car’s fuse box. Please see picture below of the furnace control board: If you find that the control board or draft inducer is at fault we sell many different types of control boards and draft inducers. Please send us your furnace’s model number and we will be glad to look it up and see which control board or draft inducer your furnace uses. Our email address is: support@arnoldservice.com

If your fuse is blown you will want to check and see if any of the low voltage thermostat wires are touching the metal frame of the furnace or grounding out. Most of the time I see fuses that are blown from animals chewing through the thermostat wires and from the wires grounding out to the body of the furnace where the wires enter or exit the furnace. The vibration of the furnace over time sometimes wears through the wires insulation and causes a short to ground. I would try a new fuse first, then if the fuse blows again you are going to need to find out where the wires are shorting out. This can be quiet time consuming. If you get tired of burning up fuses we have a tool called the LiL Popper that has a button you can push in when the fuse blows instead of having to throw away fuses. We sell the Lil Popper on the following page: Please click here if you are interested in seeing the Lil Popper tool that we sell.

If your fuse is OK, tape your door safety switch shut so you can view the status LED light on the control board with the furnace power on. Please remember to turn the power back off before touching anything inside the furnace. I do not want to hear of anyone getting hurt or shocked! Turn your thermostat up so it is calling for heat. Let the furnace cycle and see if the Status LED flashes a code. The directions for reading the code are usually located on the furnace door. The code will usually tell you what is wrong with the furnace. Technology is amazing! Best of luck on repairing your furnace. Please remember to turn that power back off before touching anything. Please email us or comment below if you have any questions. Our email address is support@arnoldservice.com

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